Biblical Studies

The Mediator - Volume IV Issue 1 October 2002

This issue of The Mediator explores the theme of communicating the gospel of hope in ways that are relevant to our world. We are confronted with this question: What hope can the gospel communicate to a world that is increasingly secular and pluralistic? The emptiness of post-modernism confronts not only North America and Europe but also many countries of the Asia-Pacific region. The creedal answers from the Church's great confessions of faith are not always sufficient to convince skeptical people that there is an almighty God who cares for them. To many, God is increasingly becoming irrelevant and old-fashioned; God (capital "G") has become a god (lower case "g"). For some, God is either so transcendent as to be unapproachable or so immanent as to be ineffective. For others, the idea of a personal "God" is naive and even offensive. Hope has become like truth, an elusive abstract that no one can grasp. The daily news does little to help grow hope but instead creates fear and uncertainty. How does the gospel answer an atmosphere of hopelessness? The 2001-05 quadrennial theme for the Church of the Nazarene is "Jesus the Hope ." As theologians of the church, what message of hope can we offer that will make a difference in a dying world? Hope cannot be found in anything in this world. Our hope as believers is anchored beyond this world—in Jesus Christ. Our hope is not placed in dogmatic claims of the church or theological suppositions about a transcendent God, but our hope is placed in a person who lived among us. Our hope is in a person who lived in this fallen world but who also proclaimed freedom for the prisoners, recovery of sight for the blind, and release to the oppressed (Luke 4:18). Our optimism in grace is tempered by a genuine concern for the world. Yet we find hope difficult because hope has a degree of uncertainty about it. Hope involves being dependent upon another, and we want to be independent We want the source of our hope to be within our control. Hope must be expressed in tangible ways. Our hope is not simply for a blessed afterlife but leads us to live a certain way in the present. It gives us joy in the midst of sorrow. It gives us victory in seeming defeat It gives us peace in the heat of battle.

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Scripture's Distinctives and Dynamic: Towards an Asia-Pacfic Hermeneutic of Holiness

Author, Editor, Compiler, etc.: 
David A. Ackerman

Papers and Reflections from the 2003 Asia-Pacific Regional Theology Conference (October 2003) Korea Nazarene University.

A group of over 35 theological educators and church leaders gathered at Korea Nazarene University on October 7-9, 2003, to explore together a most critical topic. The international makeup of this group, representing over ten countries of the Asia-Pacific Region as well as the U.S.A. and United Kingdom, brought a richness to the discussion of how to make Scripture relevant to the peoples of these lands.

The Mediator - Volume XIII, Issue 1 December 2017

The Mediator’s present issue features the installation speeches of five APNTS faculty members (Dick O. Eugenio, Phillip E. Davis, Daniel Behr, Rebecca Da-vis, and Lynn D. Shmidt) and the inauguration address of APNTS’s seventh president, Dr. Bruce E. Oldham.Naturally, the six inducteesrepresent six different academic disciplines.One would expect, therefore, that the articles in the present issue would exhib-it a pronounced lack of cohesion.

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Eating from the Tree of the Knowledge of Good and Evil: Exorcisms of Scripture and the Bible as Evil Text

Building upon Paul Tillich's analysis of demonic politico-theological structures and Marilyn McCord Adams' treatment of "horrendous evils," this article explores the Bible's capacity to effect existential ruin when incorporated within theological systems that demand fanatical obedience from adherents.

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A Girardian Reading of Violent Imagery in Revelation

René Girard's theories on the mimetic relationship between violence and religion and the genesis and maintenance of culture have had a profound impact on many disciplines. The Colloquium on
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Landmarks on the Road to the Kingdom

Author, Editor, Compiler, etc.: 
H. Ray Dunning

Table of Contents:

Holy Living in a Pagan Context: Studies in First and Second Peter

Author, Editor, Compiler, etc.: 
H. Ray Dunning

Contents:

Introduction

First Peter

Part One - Indicatives of Identity and Blessing
     Chapter 1 - Resident Aliens (1:1; 2:11)
     Chapter 2 - God's Chosen People (1:2)
     Chapter 3 - Salvation Benefits (1:3-5)
     Chapter 4 - The New Temple (2:4-8)
     Chapter 5 - The New Israel (2:9-10)

Aemilia Lanyer’s Defense of Women

In Salve Deus Rex Judæorum, Aemilia Lanyer uses the Bible as a literary source in order to offer her own interpretation of Biblical material. Due to the Bible’s universal and authoritative reach in her British society, Lanyer uses Scripture as common ground to look at from her unique female perspective.

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BEFORE IT’S TOO LATE! Interpreting Words and Images in Revelation.

The purpose of this essay is to suggest that Revelation could be interpreted as a series of images and sounds, rather than as a text, full of words. I have not done a full content analysis, but a quick review yields a number of clues to sensory images: “Revelation” itself is a visual term. The book itself was meant to be read aloud “Blessed is the one who reads the words of this prophecy and blessed are those who hear it.” Rev. 1:3. One problem with a purely linguistic interpretation is the details.

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